free webpage hit counter

How to access Lake Tahoe Sand Harbor? movie theater

Sand Harbor, with its long beach, turquoise waters and white granite cliffs, is undoubtedly one of Lake Tahoe’s most iconic destinations, a favorite among locals and visitors alike. Because it is so popular, it is not easy to get here. Unless you pull up the gates as soon as the gates open at 7am, your chances of getting inside Sand Harbor State Park are slim to none.

When the parking lot fills up — which usually happens within minutes — Nevada State Park officials close the gate. And the entrance to the park will be closed for the rest of the day, with a row of orange traffic cones blocking access to the beach.

But there’s another way to get into Sand Harbor that allows for hours of glorious sun-drenched beach time and warm water swimming — and you don’t have to load your beach gear into the car in the morning. My secret? movie theater

Sand Harbor is not just a beach. It is also the stage for a 50-year-old theatrical event called the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival.

Shakespeare performances on the stage in Sand Harbor are a summer tradition in Lake Tahoe.

Shakespeare performances on the stage in Sand Harbor are a summer tradition in Lake Tahoe.

Courtesy of Joy Strotz / Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival

Last week, I drove into Sand Harbor and pulled into the gate a few minutes after 5 p.m. I showed the state park employee our pre-paid parking pass and he waved us right through. We found a parking lot near the beach entrance. . A few minutes later, I was sitting in my beach chair, drinking Spindrift, watching the light dance on the water and letting the sun warm my skin.

In the summer, Lake Tahoe serves as the backdrop while actors bring Shakespeare to life. The setting really makes the show stand apart from other theater experiences, but that’s not to diminish the talent on stage. The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival is part of an alliance with two other theater groups in Boise, Idaho and Cleveland, Ohio, bringing a steady stream of experienced stage actors to the Sierra. The Sand Harbor Shows are one of my favorite summer traditions in Tahoe. It’s a unique must-do experience that lives up to its hype.

With turquoise waters, sandy beaches and granite cliffs, Sand Harbor is a popular destination in Lake Tahoe.

With turquoise waters, sandy beaches and granite cliffs, Sand Harbor is a popular destination in Lake Tahoe.

Rachid Dahnoun/Getty Images/Aurora Open

‘Bard on the Beach’

The Shakespeare in Lake Tahoe tradition began in 1972, when a troupe performed in front of the Hellman-Ehrman Mansion at Sugar Pine Point State Park on the West Shore. He called it “Bard on the Beach”. A few years later, the shows moved to Skylandia Park in Tahoe City. But growing popularity and a steady rise in attendance quickly outgrew that spot. Sand Harbor opened its doors to the festival in 1978 and has been host ever since.

Shakespeare might sound fancy, but in Tahoe, the festival has always had a pretty grounded and rootsy vibe. Picnics are encouraged and the show is BYOB, so pack your cooler and mix your own margaritas. The stage is set at the foot of the amphitheater, with the seats rising up the sand hill. For a long time, most seats were first-come, first-served.

My first experiences at a Shakespeare festival were with a group of friends. We showed up early, put on blankets, opened some wine and had a potluck dinner before the show started.

Now, the entire amphitheater has reserved seats, arranged in rows. Given the popularity of Sand Harbor and the shows, that’s a good thing. I bought the ticket months ago. Prices for adult tickets range from $35 to $100. We went to a mid-week show and when we pulled into Sand Harbor that day, I saw signs that said the show was sold out.

Due to its popularity, entering Sand Harbor State Park can be difficult unless you arrive right after the gates open at 7am.

Due to its popularity, entering Sand Harbor State Park can be difficult unless you arrive right after the gates open at 7am.

Flash Parker/Getty Images

I wouldn’t say I’m a Shakespeare fan, not even close. I haven’t read his work since my high school English teacher required it. Still, I’m old enough to say that I started my teenage years watching Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes in “Romeo + Juliet.” Still, I had no idea that Shakespeare could actually make me laugh so hard that I cried when I saw “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” live on stage. Perhaps it’s the setting on the beach that makes the whole experience lighter. But I’ve got a clear preference for Shakespeare’s comedies in Sand Harbor.

This year, the festival is hosting two performances, including Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing.” For the second show, the festival unveiled a twist — not a play by Shakespeare, but one that perfectly fits the setting with Lake Tahoe as the backdrop. In a rare but welcome departure from tradition, the festival’s “Mamma Mia!” also organizes music called

ABBA was calling, and I hurried.

dancing queen

After a couple of hours of blessed beach time, we took our seats as the evening shadows lengthened. The bell rang as the program began. “Mamma Mia!” About a woman about to get married, who decides to find out who her father is. She reads her mother’s journal (gasp!) and focuses on three eligible men who were in the right place at the right time. Her mother decides to invite all three to her wedding on a Greek island where she runs a guest house. There’s one more big detail: She doesn’t tell her mom that her three exes are coming to town.

For a musical set by the water in Greece, “Mamma Mia!” The Tahoe felt like a perfect fit. The costumes, the characters – I thought this exact narrative could easily have taken place in Tahoe City in the 1990s. I loved singing, dancing. But my eyes kept looking up behind the stage as the lake changed color from turquoise to sunset orange to deep navy.

The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival takes place during the summer at Sand Harbor State Park.

The Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival takes place during the summer at Sand Harbor State Park.

Courtesy of Jen Smith / Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival

It’s been a while since I’ve seen a sunset at Lake Tahoe. At most intervals, people take breaks in the theater lobby or perhaps a busy city sidewalk. At Sand Harbor, I ran up a sand hill — with everyone else in the audience — and caught the last rays of light stretching across the basin. It was sweet to see all the families and groups of friends enjoying this exact moment, and everyone, myself included, taking lots of sunset selfies. As we took our seats before the second act, the Village People’s “YMCA” played over the speakers, and a festival employee led the audience in that universally known dance round after round. It’s not Shakespeare, but the mood is absolutely right for a perfect day in Sand Harbor.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Previous post How to view your favorite artists as Pokémon cards
Next post Sotheby’s presents the first dedicated auction of artist jewelery in New York