free webpage hit counter

Learn how to wear a helmet and ride

In this photo from April 28, a woman is riding a scooter behind a coconut club.  Standup battery powered scooters that hit the streets of Austin for the first time in 2017 have sometimes caused serious injuries.

If the sunny weather makes you think of taking an e-scooter to downtown Austin, area doctors and doctors are urging users to take precautions and protect themselves.

A recent Austin Public Health study of e-scooter-related injuries found that most of the injured riders were first-time riders. These standup battery powered scooters hit the streets of Austin for the first time in 2017, sometimes causing serious injuries.

Nicholas Stein, head of emergency medicine at the University of Texas Dell Medical School, spoke at the Austin Trauma and Critical Care Conference earlier this month on the dangers of e-scooters and expressed concern over the rise of scooter injuries in the past. Four years.

“I don’t know that we’re doing enough to inform people in the community and look at these things and think, ‘Oh, this is a convenient way to get around town,’ and then the fun stops when the ambulance stops.

More:Gas is expensive. You need an electric bike

Jason Pickett, chief deputy medical officer for Austin City, which provides medical direction for Austin-Travis County Emergency Medical Services, has treated scooter injuries, saying it is more common than most people try on weekends and special events. To navigate the city.

Helmet use, demanded education

EMS doctors often see head injuries without wearing helmets, and when they fall off scooters, they see upper body injuries as they throw their arms out in front of them, Pickett said.

A man drives an electric scooter on Congress Avenue last week.  EMS doctors usually see head injuries without wearing helmets, and when they fall off scooters, they see upper body injuries as they stretch their arms out in front of them.

“I’m not opposed to scooters as I imagine,” Pickett said. “They are energy-efficient and take people out.

But to enjoy the positives of scooters, people must wear helmets and look at cars, Pickett said, adding that Stein also emphasized.

An Austin Public Health study of e-scooter injuries published in 2019 found that only 1.6% of adult patients with e-scooter-related injuries wear a helmet. Head and face injuries are the most common e-scooted-related injuries.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Previous post The Senate Ag Detects Cattle Price and Corrects Bills
Next post What to read, watch and stream if you are obsessed with ‹CrimeReads scammers