free webpage hit counter

Parsons has been struggling with how to honor the creator of the flag of pride

The rainbow flag is one of the most recognizable symbols in the world. But there is debate over whether to honor its creator in city property in Parsons, Kansas. The backlash was fast. It opened at the Parsons City Commission meeting last November. The flag of pride was created by Gilbert Baker, who graduated from Parsons High School in 1969. Almost a decade later, he created the flag of pride. Baker died in 2017. One of his classmates, Les Hammett, paid tribute to him. The commission responded positively: “This is a wonderful opportunity for me. But soon the issue was put forward. “I went out and I talked to people and 99% of them don’t want to fly that flag on city property,” said Commissioner Kevin Cruise. “Where do you draw the line? Where do we put that Nazi? ” Another commissioner said, “I don’t know if any of their wealth or work has been used to support this community.” “Gilbert Baker has done things for people everywhere,” said Parsons resident Lauren Shepard. “I think it’s a big, missed opportunity for the city. I literally think Parsons should be like Gilbert Baker City of USA,” Shepard said. This weekend, Shepard and his friends made a memorial of their own for Parsons’ native son. Businesses display the flag and proud flags in downtown. Commissioners told the class of 1969. Design a souvenir and come back with their plans. Shepard believes that the idea will eventually have plenty of support. The Gilbert Baker Foundation responded to a comparison between the flag of pride with Nazi or Confederate flags, saying that the flag of pride is a symbol of liberation and hope. “Unfortunately, in some cities and countries where LGBTQ organizations have flourished over the years, there is a growing setback regarding the free expression of this symbol.”

The rainbow flag is one of the most recognizable symbols in the world. But there is debate over whether to honor its creator in city property in Parsons, Kansas.

The backlash was fast. It opened at the Parsons City Commission meeting last November.

The flag of pride is the creation of Gilbert Baker, who graduated in 1969 from Parsons High School. Almost a decade later, he created the flag of pride.

Baker died in 2017. One of his classmates, Les Hammett, paid tribute to him.

“Some small panel, maybe we can put a flagpole in there,” Hammett said.

The Commission has responded positively.

“To me, this is a wonderful opportunity for the recognition it deserves,” one commissioner responded.

But soon the issue was tabled.

“This is not the case for every citizen of Parsons, and I do not believe this is the case for most Parsons citizens,” one person told the commission.

“I went out and I talked to people and 99% of them don’t want that flag flying on city property,” Commissioner Kevin Cruise said.

“Where do you draw the line? Does anyone want to put a Nazi flag there? Do we put a Confederate flag there?” Said another commissioner.

“I am not aware that any of their wealth or works have been used to support this community,” said one resident.

“Gilbert Baker did things for people everywhere,” said Parsons resident Lauren Shepard.

“I think it’s a great, missed opportunity for the city. I think Parsons should be like Gilbert Baker City, USA,” Shepard said.

This weekend, Shepard and her friends made their own souvenir for a local son of Parsons by asking for business to display the flag and displaying flags of pride in downtown.

“If we don’t like how there is something in the community, work to change it wherever you are,” Shepard said.

The commissioners told the class of 1969 to design the monument and come back with their plans. Shepard believes that the idea will eventually have plenty of support.

The Gilbert Baker Foundation responded to a comparison between the flag of pride with Nazi or Confederate flags, saying that the flag of pride is a symbol of liberation and hope.

“Unfortunately, in some cities and countries where LGBTQ organizations have flourished over the years, there is a growing setback regarding the free expression of this symbol.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Previous post Volcker, Powell and amnesia about monetary policy
Next post Carnegie International unveils artists for the 2022 edition